Announcing Ponder iOS Safari Integration

Ponder Mobile for iOS has been re-released! The new build has been redesigned and rewritten for a more consistent experience across devices.

New features include:

Ponder in iOS Share MenuYou can create responses directly from Safari by selecting text and then sharing the page to Ponder through the browser share menu.

iOS Response BoxCreating a response now works the way and looks the same as creating a Ponder response with the Chrome browser add-on and Firefox browser add-ons.

 

 

The feed has also been tightened up, and now resizes to fit various new screen sizes.

New Feed

 

Finally, Ponder Mobile now supports login with your Google account, though you must have already setup your account through the desktop browser experience.

Enjoy! And let us know if you have any questions.

 

 

 

 

 

Critical Watching: Drilling Down into the Video Heatmap

Late last fall we released powerful heatmap filtering for the Ponder reading experience. We are now proud to announce a similar upgrade for Ponder Video.

Ponder Video Activity Bar

Teachers have been experiencing hundreds and hundreds of student responses on longer videos and it became obvious that we would need to make it possible to separate out participation based on groups, students, sentiments and themes, just the way we do on text documents.

We love our tick marks and the quick overview they give you, so you’ll find them in their usual place along the yellow video timeline. As before, there’s one tick mark per response at a particular timestamp in the video and the colors match the type of sentiment. Multiple responses still at the same time stamp stack on top of each other, so you can spot the points of focus by both tight clustering and the height of the bars.

Ponder Video Interface

 

 

 

 

Bookmarking stars appear below the timeline and your familiar zoom in/out UI helps with navigating longer videos. More on using the interface for critical watching on our support site.

Ponder Video Interface

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

But now here’s where it gets fancy. Notice anything different?

Now, above the timeline, underneath the video, you will find a set of filter drop-downs corresponding to the activity on the video.

Ponder Video Filter Menus

 

 

The first drop-down allows you to filter the responses by group; for example, so a teacher can see one section or period of a course they are teaching at a time. The numbers in parentheses indicates the number of responses created by that group.

Ponder Video Group Filter Menu

 

 

 

Want to see just your responses, or those from a particular student?  The second drop-down shows each responder, sorted by the number of responses they created which are indicated in parenthesis adjacent to each username.

Ponder Video User Filter

 

 

 

The third drop-down shows the mix of sentiments used in the responses, sorted by frequency (indicated in parenthesis), and allows you to filter for them.

Ponder Video Sentiment Filter

 

 

 

 

And the fourth drop-down shows the themes used in responses on the document, sorted by frequency indicated in parenthesis:

Ponder Video Theme Filter

 

 

 

As you can see, much of the Ponder power you are familiar with when navigating ideas across documents are now available for minute dissections of a single video.

And don’t forget, these capabilities are all available for custom integration on your platform through the Ponder API.

National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) Journal Features Ponder

We are honored to be featured in Dr. Kristen Hawley Turner and Dr. Troy Hicks’ piece in the NCTE’s November 2015 English Journal (Vol. 105, No. 2) entitled “Connected Reading Is the Heart of Research.”

The piece introduces a framework for teaching adolescents to read, but it also advocates a more thoughtful approach to the application of technology in the English classroom through an introspective exploration of what it means to be digitally literate.

NCTE Logo

“We must advocate for digital literacy, not just technology, in a way that reconceptualizes our discipline.”

A sample Ponder lesson walk-through in the piece explains how the collaborative annotation experience supports shared inquiry during research for an essay, and how Ponder’s interface speeds the teacher’s review of student activity, allowing them to better lead class discussion.

Both former K-12 English teachers, Dr. Turner is a professor of Curriculum and Teaching at Fordham University where she directs the Fordham Digital Literacies Collaborative, and Dr. Hicks is a professor of English Language & Literature at Central Michigan University where he directs CMU’s Chippewa River Writing Project.

Also check out their 2015 book Connected Reading: Teaching Adolescent Readers in a Digital World.

Forest(s) for the Trees: Filtering Ponder Heatmaps

Ponder provides a place to collect and share your thoughts about your reading, but what to do when you’ve collected a lot of thoughts on a particular piece? Even tens of responses on a single page can get overwhelming, and groups of students often create hundreds, so we’ve added some tools to make it easier to navigate them.Familiar Tick-marks

We love our tick marks and the quick overview they give you, so you’ll find them in their usual place on the right side of the window. As before, there’s one tick mark per excerpt that elicited at least one response, and the colors match the type of sentiment. You’ll also still find each selection underlined in the page, so you’ll see and can reply to them as you’re reading.

Introducing the Ponder Sidebar

As before, clicking a tick mark or underline will scroll your window to the location of the corresponding text in the document, but it will also expand the Ponder sidebar where the new review tools live. (If you need to dismiss the sidebar, just click anywhere outside the sidebar.)

Ponder Sidebar

In the sidebar, you’ll see a list of all the excerpts from your groups. Similar to your feed, all the responses for a given excerpt are bundled together in a “nugget”. When the sidebar opens, the nugget for the tick mark you clicked will be highlighted. You’ll also see some summary stats and drop-downs – more on that in a moment.

Anatomy of a Nugget

The nugget shows the sentiment of the user who made the first response on that excerpt, in this case, badtz appreciates the eloquence of the statement “We are not interested in students just picking an answer, but justifying the answers.” Sidebar Nugget

At the bottom, you can see that 1 other user has replied to Badtz’s comment, and then a green box with a 1 and a yellow box with a 1. Each box indicates the number of responses with each sentiment type. In this case, Badtz’s response was a green/analytical comment. Clicking on the ellipsis exposes the details of the yellow/cognitive reply.

Replying and removing responses

Mousing-over the nugget gives you the option to add your own response to this excerpt (Respond/Update), or remove it (the X).

Embed Respond Box

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sorting and Filtering 

But what if there are a bunch of responses? We’ve added the ability to sort and filter to make it easier to review responses. At the top of the sidebar, you now see summary metrics for the document – the total number of excerpts annotated and the number of annotations on those excerpts. Using the drop-downs at the top, you can filter those responses by group, responder, sentiment, and theme.

The first drop-down allows you to filter the responses by group; for example, so a teacher can see one section at a time. The numbers in parentheses indicates the number of responses created by that group.

Group Filter

 

 

 

 

Want to see just your responses, or those from a particular student?  The second drop-down shows each responder, sorted by the number of responses they created which are indicated in parenthesis adjacent to each username.

User Filter

 

 

 

 

The third drop-down shows the mix of sentiments used in the responses, sorted by frequency (indicated in parenthesis), and allows you to filter for them.

Sentiment Filter

 

 

 

 

And the fourth drop-down shows the themes used in responses on the document, sorted by frequency indicated in parenthesis:

Theme Filter Dropdown

 

 

 

 

 

The filters work together and filter each other; for example, when you filter for a particular group, the other filters will only include the users, sentiments, and themes on activity for that group.

Lastly, underneath the filters is the sort drop-down.Sort Dropdown

  • # of Replies sorts the nuggets by the number of replies that occurred on each.
  • # of Themes sorts all of the excerpts by the number of themes that were tagged to each.
  • Controversy sorts the excerpts by the measure of disagreement based on sentiment and sentiment type usage on each.
  • Last Updated shows the most recently updated nuggets first.

 

As you can see, much of the Ponder power you are familiar with when navigating ideas across documents are now available for minute dissections of a single document or passage.

And don’t forget, these capabilities are all available for custom integration on your platform through the Ponder API.

Ideas Never Sleep: Powered by the Ponder API

Back in May we announced the release of our V2 API, but at the time couldn’t tell you about the exciting progress our early partners were making. Now we can. Powered by Ponder

The WR Berkley Innovation Lab at New York University’s Stern School of Business has launched Ideas Never Sleep, a community built on fresh ideas from academics in their community and beyond, and it’s powered by our V2 API.

INS publishes a steady stream of well produced videos of provocative conversations with thought leaders on a range of social, political and economic issues that start you pondering. Luckily, our API provides a way for readers and watchers to articulate that pondering quickly and thoughtfully. Their implementation also demonstrates the flexibility that the API provides in terms of integrating annotation and discussion into each partner’s unique look and feel.

So far they have integrated the video response interface, visible to the right of the Youtube embed in the screenshot below, with 8 sentiments and an elaboration box. Below the video, you can see the response timeline, with tick marks indicating the points in the video to which users have commented. One user’s comment is selected and the sentiment and elaboration are visible.Of course you don’t have to squint at the screenshot, you can see this particular video piece (and others) live!

Congratulate them on the launch, the great design, check it out and join the conversation!

INS Cryptocurrency 101

INS Cryptocurrency 101 by Professor David Yermack